All About Sorority Rush

sorority-rush-make-connections

Whether you are a freshman or about to finish college, sorority rush is a great way to meet new people and make connections. Most colleges begin rush either a few weeks before school starts or a month or so into the fall semester. The entering freshman class receives the opportunity to get to know more students during their first year by participating in sorority rush even if they decide not to pledge.

Pick up an Application

fcd4f5187adfc887f07b2eeb8b81067c

Students are to visit student life and pick up an application to start the process of rush. The application requires the students to attach a photo, along with a description of their academic and extra-curricular accomplishments, their year in college, their major, and their GPA. The sororities look for the most well-rounded students that excel in both academics and extra-curricular activities, since the sororities compete with one another throughout the year to strive to make the best impression on next year’s group of new potential members. The sororities use this application to select new members as they review their interactions and interviews with the potential new members each night of rush.

Prepare for Rush Week

sorority-rush-prepare

Rush lasts for a week and is a rigorous process that requires the potential new members to communicate efficiently with numerous sorority members per house, dress properly, be knowledgeable about each sorority and describe how the new member would benefit the organization as a whole. At the start of sorority rush the potential new members are divided into small groups with a Rho Gamma leader. The Rho Gamma directs and guides the potential new members through the process. The Rho Gamma presents their experience going through rush to the new members, in order to encourage them as they prepare for each night. It is usually best to have some idea of which sororities you are more interested in than others before starting rush. Also, it is best to have some connections with others that have already been through rush before to ask for advice and to have connections with a sorority or fraternity before deciding to pledge. Some of the women’s sororities are actually known as fraternities and new members should be knowledgeable of the distinctions between each sorority.

First Night of Sorority Rush: Open House

images

The first night of rush consists of an open house. The first night is usually the most difficult experience because the new members are just becoming adjusted to talking to at least four or five members per house in a relatively short amount of time. On the first night, potential new members should make a good first impression by describing their academic and or extra-curricular accomplishments. It is best to already know about the philanthropy and the interests of the sorority or fraternity beforehand, but if not you can still do well as long as you strive to make a significant effort to learn about the organizations as you go through the process.

Second Night of Sorority Rush: House Tours

sorority-rush-house-tours

The second night is the house tours. On this night, the sororities try their best to impress the potential new members with singing, performances, various hands on activities, and introductions to the philanthropies. This is the time when the potential new members should pay the most attention to detail as they are to present themselves as confident in their future membership through their knowledge of the sororities’ and fraternities’ interests and expectations. The potential new members should try to be even more engaged in conversation as they interconnect their own interests and accomplishments with the views and standards of each sorority or fraternity. You can be invited to up to three houses until the final night.

Final Night of Sorority Rush: Pref

sorority-rush-pref

The final night is pref night and at this time you can only be invited to up to two parties. This night is known as the most critical one-on-one experience of all the nights during rush between the members and the potential new members. At this time, the members are trying to make the final decision as to which potential new members will receive a bid to join the sorority. The potential new members should try to persuade the members as to why they believe that they could make a difference in the sorority or fraternity and more importantly that they are more interested in the organization than the other girls.

Bid Day

sorority-rush-bid-day

The sororities will only choose the girls that they are more convinced will be involved in the sorority and that are genuinely interested in joining. Some of the pressure can be taken off the potential new members as they realize that the members are trying harder to convince the new members as to why they should join their organization and that all they have to do is describe how interested they are in Greek life. Rush is worthwhile because you make new friends and learn how can improve college life by joining a sorority. Bid day is a once in a life time experience and if you make it that far you have proven how you belong in an organization that exemplifies true leadership and sets a positive example on campus.

Comment below with your sorority rush questions or experiences!

About Julie Mathis

Julie Mathis was born in Birmingham, Al. on December 29, 1988, where she grew up as an only child. She attended Samford University, a prestigious private university in Birmingham where she majored in Nursing and I received honor medals from being included in the Dean’s List my freshman and sophomore years. She was a member of the Alpha Lambda Delta freshman honor society, and became a member of the fraternity, Zeta Tau Alpha. She then attended Birmingham-Southern College, one of America’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges, where she became a member of the honor society for English majors, Sigma Tau Delta, and graduated with the honorary status of Cum Laude from BSC. She is now a graduate student at Delta State University in Cleveland, MS., and she enjoys writing, reading, and studying the sciences as well as the humanities.