finals week

12 Memes We All Relate To During Finals Week

It’s time to prepare for mental breakdowns and all-nighters. Why? Because it’s finals week! On every college student’s least favorite week of the semester, you’ll find yourself pouring Red Bull into your coffee, calculating the lowest score you can get to pass your classes, and just plain wondering why you chose the major you chose. During this stressful time, it’s good to at least get in a laugh or two, so here’s a list of 12 memes we can all relate to during finals!

 

1. The week before finals

 

2. When you start studying the night before the exam

 

3. What personal hygiene looks like during finals week

 

4. When you’re asked how you slept the night before your final

 

5. Every time…

 

6. How your professor arrives to the final exam

 

7. During the final exam

 

8. After that first exam

 

9. When your finals aren’t going so well

 

10. Trying to reason with your professor after the exam

 

11. How walking out of your last final feels

 

12. What you retain after finals are over

 

Kid President’s Finals Week Pep Talk

The end of the semester is quickly approaching which can only mean one thing…*cue dramatic music and lightning* finals week is upon us!  Ugh, didn’t just the mention of finals week make your brain hurt? I know mine does. As the semester draws to a close, I think it’s safe to say that we’re all starting to feel a little burnt out. Hey, don’t worry! The semester blues are inevitable and boy oh boy, do I have a cure for you!

Here’s a little pep talk from Kid President to help lift your spirits and get you through the next few weeks.  You are welcome!

The Do’s and Don’ts of Finals

finalsFinals, unfortunately, are a time full of stress. During this hectic time, there are certain habits you should keep some you need to kick immediately. Here’s a list of some dos and don’ts for finals time.

Do: Study. This should be a given, but now is not the time to be lazy. If anything, you should be studying more than you have all semester. The only time it’s safe to say not to study would be if you know you’re guaranteed a grade in the class.

Don’t: Lie in bed and watch Netflix all day. This should be another given, but it’s easy to be tempted. Create a reward system for yourself. Maybe for every hour of studying, treat yourself to one episode. Now is not the time to have a Friday Night Lights marathon

Do: Exercise. Working out is a great stress reliever. Give yourself a half hour each day to take your mind off school. It’ll also help counter the junk food you’re bound to eat while studying.

Don’t: Give up (too much) sleep. I know firsthand that it’s easy to cut hours of sleep in exchange for a few more hours of cramming. But a lack of sleep is not healthy, and you can actually perform worse if you’re over-tired. If there’s no way around an all-nighter, make a schedule where you have a nap every couple hours. You’ll thank yourself later.

Do: Work with a partner or study group. The saying “two heads are better than one” is so true for this time of year. Get together with classmates and quiz each other on test material. Working with a partner often helps you retain information better and create fun ways to remember difficult concepts.

Don’t: Expect your classmates to do all the work. Nothing is more annoying than getting a text the night before an exam from that one kid who never came to class and now wants you to send him all of your notes from the ENTIRE semester. Do not, I repeat, do not be this student. If you chose to forgo class in exchange for an extra hour of sleep every morning, rent the textbook (short term rentals are great in this situation) or look on Quizlet for previous students’ flashcards.

What are some of your recommendations for what to do or not to do during finals week?

10 Tried and True Tips for Pulling an All-Nighter

It’s here, the time of the year when college students from all over the country are scrambling to organize for the misery that is finals week. My gut tells me that there are some students who study weeks and months in advance to prepare, however the rest of us will have some long nights and early days in the next week or two. I know I will. If you’re a freshman, you might be asking yourself, how am I supposed to learn 10 chapters of Spanish in one day? Or how can I memorize this 15-page study guide in one night? The answer is simple: Pulling the infamous all-nighter. The all-nighter is among the most deadly weapons that a procrastinating student can use in this battle of knowledge that is “higher education.” Most of us have been there before, some of us multiple times, so what is the best way to use this weapon? Here is a list of tips that I’ve come up with during my 3 years in college.

  1. Study Groups – Think about it this way. Everyone in the class must complete the 10-page study guide. If 5 students all chip in, that’s only 2 pages of work for each person. Furthermore, it will give everyone more time to study what he or she needs to know instead of searching for answers.
  2. Caffeine – Whether your caffeine fix involves coffee, soft drinks or energy drinks, finals week is the time to use it to your advantage. Do NOT overuse caffeine if you’re panicking. My advice is study for 90 minutes, then take a short break and consume your drink of choice. Use sparingly and caffeine will be your friend.
  3. Take Breaks – This will ultimately slow you down, but it will help you avoid being sidetracked. I usually take a break every 90 minutes to give my brain a rest from information overload.
  4. Music – I like instrumental music the best during finals week. I’ve found that it’s less of a distraction and it still keeps my brain stimulated. I think it’s ultimately beneficial and helps time go by faster.
  5. 2 Tests to Study For? – It’s best to switch up subject every once in a while, to avoid brain drain. Try studying subject 1 for 90 minutes, taking a short break, and studying subject 2 for 90 minutes.
  6. Don’t Fall Asleep – This is without a doubt the most challenging part of pulling an all-nighter. Some tips on staying awake: take a cold shower, spicy foods can help, exercise will get your blood pumping again, take a smoke break, play a quick game of solitaire, make a quick phone call or talk to someone from your class about your study guide. What ever you do, DO NOT take a nap. That 10 minutes will turn into 30, which will turn into the entire night.
  7. Don’t Give Up – If you find yourself in an impossible studying position, just keep on moving. This can be very hard when your stress level is that high, however I have found that it is best to suffer through it. Think about it this way: do you want to go home and fall asleep, knowing that you gave up? Or do you want to study hard all night and go into the exam feeling confident?
  8. Forget about “I’ll finish this in the morning” – No, you wont. Especially if you are getting little to no sleep already. Think about it realistically: If you go to bed at 5 am, and have a test at 9 am, do you really think that you will wake up at 7am and do equations? It’s nearly impossible to wake up clear-headed and ready to do work after two hours of sleep.
  9. Try to laugh – It will keep your stress from taking over, and it will keep your brain stimulated. Try your favorite YouTube videos during breaks. Also a good way that I’ve found is to call a classmate who you know will be less prepared than you. Their progress will give you that little tiny bit of motivation needed to move on.
  10. Stay Confident – This is easier for some than others, but staying confident and positive about your scholastic ability will ultimately help your study session. For example, knowing that you have the confidence to do well will help your brain take in more information. It’s like knowing you’re better than someone in basketball, that confidence might just be the difference in the game.

Bonus Tip – If you’re freaking out, call your Mom or Dad. I have done this many times over the years, and it has helped me greatly. There is something about talking to my mother that helps me calm the storm and keep moving forward. Tell your Mom or Dad that you are freaking out, and ask them for advice. Their advice might not be golden, but just talking to them will help lower your stress levels.

All-nighters are technically not great for your body or mind, however sometimes you have to step up to the plate and do what you have to do, or fail. The choice is yours, choose wisely!

Good Luck Everyone.

Alabaster

I’m reading Economics: Principles, Problems, and Policies